The Top Seven Skills of Great Coaches: Coach Your Team to the Championship

16 Jun

The NBA championships just finished and we watched  the  teams finish their seasons, move through the division playoffs and move into the finals.  They start the year, as do all of the teams, with goals and expectations to be the champs.  The difference:  only one team accomplishes their goal.  So, what makes that happen?

I competed on sports teams from the age of nine through college and into my adult years.  I was on championship teams and, far more often, I was on the “also ran” teams that came close or didn’t place at all.  On both the championship and “also ran” teams, we had top talent that no one could touch, yet, that wasn’t the only differentiator that created wins.  The difference, in large part, always seemed to come down to the coach.

The coaches who stand out have consistent traits that leaders today can practice. Create your “championship team” with these top seven skills:

  1. Inspire – motivate with your words and actions.  Do what you say you will do to create trust and follow-up with words that communicate your belief in your team.  When you demonstrate your belief in a person, they will rise beyond expectations.
  2. Listen – avoid judging and give your full attention.  Listening is more than keeping your mouth closed.  It requires you to dial-in and make sure you’ve received the intended message.  When you listen with unbiased focus, you validate the other person and make a stronger connection, and you pick-up on information that you may never have gotten.
  3. Observe – watch for what’s going on in the workplace and pick-up on how people feel about things.  Great tools that you have with you at all times are your eyes and ears.  Use them to gather information, check out your instincts, and create points of reference for feedback and discussion.
  4. Guide – provide the WHAT so that your team can perform the HOW.  Point people in the right direction, observe them, and coach them to adjust their course.  You want to be the guide on the side versus the sage on the (workplace) stage.
  5. Ask questions –build commitment by asking versus telling.  Before jumping in with the answers or your ideas, ask for their input and ideas.  Become great at asking questions that guide and encourage others to take action.  There’s a lot more commitment when people come up with the action they need to take.
  6. Give feedback – gift your team with reinforcing and developmental feedback.  Everyone needs a compass to know where they are – feedback is just that.  Let people know what’s working and let them know when they need to make a course correction.  Part of guiding others is providing feedback that defines the WHAT that needs to be accomplished and where the HOW is or isn’t working.
  7. Build confidence – elevate your team by helping people believe that they can.  When you communicate your trust in other’s abilities and support them with the tools and resources they need to get things done, you boost their confidence.  Confidence is the first step to achieving great things.

Ralph Waldo Emerson said:  Treat a man as he is, and he will remain as he is. Treat a man as he should be, and he will become what he could be.

Leaders have an important role in the success of teams.  What coaching skills will create the difference for your teams?  What will you do to treat your team as the champions they could be?

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